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Infanoj

başlangıç SonicChao, 21 Şubat 2007

Mesajlar: 22

Dil: English

erinja (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 15:38:16

This goes both ways too, sometimes English words make it into other languages and are used to mean something unfamiliar to English speakers.

I remember how stumped I was when I first encountered "il footing" in Italian.

(jogging!)

Islander (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 15:45:52

Well, I don't think that's real Italian. It's more American Italian, which is a mix of classic Italian, English and hand gestures. rideto.gif

It does make sense to me, however: Il footing = he's going on foot.

That demonstrate how any root can be used as a noun, an dejective, an adverb and even a verb, like it is in Esperanto, even if a direct translation doesn't always make sense.

SonicChao (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 15:59:35

I see, there also isn't an entry for 'teenanger' in la vortaro.

Words do change meaning over time, so to an English speaker it would seem strange to call children "enfants" but not to the French. rido.gif

erinja (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 16:20:43

Islander:Well, I don't think that's real Italian. It's more American Italian, which is a mix of classic Italian, English and hand gestures. rideto.gif
Nope, it's actually Italian-Italian. I run across it occasionally in Italian texts from Italy, and have never seen it in the US. It was actually in the sports chapter of the textbook for an Italian class I once took, plus it is found in Italian dictionaries. For example, the De Mauro dictionary (http://www.demauroparavia.it/) defines it as "corsa praticata, spec. in scioltezza, come allenamento sportivo o in genere come attività salutare".

"running for practice, especially informally, as sports training or in the nature of activity for health" (bad translation, I know, but it gets the idea across)

As for teenager - some people say "dekumjarulo". Some others just say "junulo", which spans a wider range (roughly high school - university). Some say "adoleskanto" but that sounds overly scientific to me.

Islander (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 16:31:41

The word is adoleskanto , similar to the French word adolescent, which would be another word English borrowed.

From what I understand, teenagER is not a real word as it should be teenage boy.

Mendacapote (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 17:02:23

Dekumjarulo is English disguised of Esperanto. Teen (13-19) ager, only makes sense in English. Adoleskanto is much more universal.

pastorant (Profili görüntüle) 22 Şubat 2007 19:03:06

Mendacapote:Dekumjarulo is English disguised of Esperanto. Teen (13-19) ager, only makes sense in English. Adoleskanto is much more universal.
Isn't it dekkelkjarulo?

erinja (Profili görüntüle) 23 Şubat 2007 00:33:21

Mendacapote:Dekumjarulo is English disguised of Esperanto. Teen (13-19) ager, only makes sense in English. Adoleskanto is much more universal.
Who is to say that the Esperanto "dekumjarulo" corresponds exactly with the ages 13-19? I understand "dekumjarulo" to cover the ages between 10 and 19, personally.

And actually, the person who suggested that word to me was not a native English speaker, and my understanding is that her English isn't even very good, so I doubt very much that she was using English as a basis for the word.

I don't really think that "dekkelkjarulo" is any better than "dekumjarulo". The -um- ending is specifically for these nebulous kinds of meanings. A shirt collar is a kol/um/o; a cuff on a sleeve is a man/um/o.

In any case, anyone who doesn't like those words can feel free to use "adoleskant(in)o" or "junul(in)o", according to their preference.

Kwekubo (Profili görüntüle) 23 Şubat 2007 00:43:34

Hm. Dekkelkjarulo is clearer to me than dekumjarulo - but why fuss over it, the meaning of all these words is more than clear enough. Take your pick.

pastorant (Profili görüntüle) 23 Şubat 2007 01:01:29

Kwekubo:Hm. Dekkelkjarulo is clearer to me than dekumjarulo - but why fuss over it, the meaning of all these words is more than clear enough. Take your pick.
I had trouble comprehending dekumjarulo. I never likeds the -um- ending anyway (even though it has its uses, I believe it can be abused like using je. I looked at it and thought of a 10-11 yr old. I then looked up dekumi it the definition was more baffling. To decimate! For that word, I would've used detruegi, but that's just me. ridulo.gif
For me, I think it's easier to use words that any speaker of Esperanto can understand, like the word taboo . I know it's technically tabuo , but that gives no explanation of its meaning. Neesprimeblo is understandable. I may be from Japan and not know what the word "taboo" means, but neesprimebla is understandable if not elegant. Since E-o is supposed to be universal and easily understood, definitions should cross cultural barriers, no? Maybe I'm being picky (preciozema?) ridulo.gif

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