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Do you use "na"?

by rann, September 14, 2015

Messages: 129

Language: English

rann (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 2:28:22 AM

"Na" is an unofficial preposition that marks the accusative when it's not possible to add -n like , unu, iom, book titles etc. You can find more info here. Personally, I think that it's a neat addition to vocabulary that can actually used practically to clarify some sentences especially when they use the correlatives. I would certainly use it myself.

What are your thoughts on it?

bryku (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 5:24:56 AM

rann:"Na" is an unofficial preposition that marks the accusative when it's not possible to add -n like , unu, iom, book titles etc. You can find more info [url=/wiki/Na_(prepozicio)]here[/url]. Personally, I think that it's a neat addition to vocabulary that can actually used practically to clarify some sentences especially when they use the correlatives. I would certainly use it myself.

What are your thoughts on it?
I never use such "inventions". It is simply not necessary.

Fenris_kcf (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 6:38:44 AM

I use it.

vikungen (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 7:07:51 AM

rann:"Na" is an unofficial preposition that marks the accusative when it's not possible to add -n like , unu, iom, book titles etc. You can find more info here. Personally, I think that it's a neat addition to vocabulary that can actually used practically to clarify some sentences especially when they use the correlatives. I would certainly use it myself.

What are your thoughts on it?
It's never impossible to add an -n to eg. book titles, I don't use "na" as there is no real use for it, most of the times it will be clear who's doing what, who's reading what in your example, if not just strap an -n to the end, or -on if it ends in a consonant and you want it to be able to be read out loud.

Mi ŝatas Facebook-on

Mi uzas la iPhone-n

Mi legas Hunger Games-on

etc.

Many languages do the same, etc. in Norwegian we strap the definite article on the end, so "I use the iPhone" becomes Jeg bruker iPhone-n, and what do you know, we're doing fine without inventing new words.

Miland (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 8:15:29 AM

I don't use it myself. I omit the accusative with names in speaking.

Alkanadi (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 8:49:56 AM

Miland:I don't use it myself. I omit the accusative with names in speaking.
I think this is what most people do.

Can anyone give some examples of how na is used. I have never heard of this before.

tommjames (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 8:53:35 AM

rann:Do you use "na"?
No, I prefer to speak real Esperanto. And "na" is almost completely useless anyway, so I never saw a need for it.

Fenris_kcf (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 9:05:50 AM

Alkanadi:Can anyone give some examples of how na is used. I have never heard of this before.
„Ŝi uzas na Linux.“

The other possibility is to rely on the word-order, though that would make the following impossible (ok, the semantics would still give clarity):
„Na Linux uzas Alice.“

Alkanadi (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 9:23:16 AM

Fenris_kcf:„Na Linux uzas Alice.“
I see the potential problem.

Alice amas John <-- Who loves who?

Apple jurpersekutas Microsoft <-- who is suing who?

I guess it makes sense to use na if you don't want to add the -n ending.

jagr2808 (User's profile) September 14, 2015, 9:24:24 AM

Alkanadi:
Fenris_kcf:„Na Linux uzas Alice.“
I see the potential problem.

Alice amas John <-- Who loves who?

I guess it makes sense to use na if you don't want to add the -n ending.
Alice amas John-on....

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