Kwa maudhui

trinki/drinki

ya fojo, 10 Mei 2006

Ujumbe: 5

hugha: English

fojo (Wasifu wa mtumiaji) 10 Mei 2006 3:07:39 alasiri

I have just learned through a simple dictionary search that both exist, one meaning drinking too much. Is that true? It is strange theres no a suffix or something to convey that meaning....

Kat (Wasifu wa mtumiaji) 11 Mei 2006 8:40:01 alasiri

Hi! / Saluton!

Yup, you've got it right.  I've got a copy of Peter Benson's "Comprehensive English-Esperanto Dictionary" and the entry for "drink" says (in part):

 drink, (gen), trinki [tr];...(drink alcoholic beverages, esp to excess), drinki [int]

Though you're referred also to the entry for "drunk" which has "ebria" as its root.  "Drunkard" is listed as "drink(em)ulo", tho, whereas "get drunk" is "ebrigi" (that is, if you're getting someone else drunk) or "ebriĝi" (getting drunk).

I'm not sure why you'd have "drinki" and then also "ebrigi/iĝi".  Perhaps "drinki" is a colloquialism.  Hopefully someone in the know will pop in and answer the question (which is a good one, I think)!

Ĝis --

 -- Katjo

taneli (Wasifu wa mtumiaji) 16 Julai 2006 4:53:55 alasiri

I'd say that "drinki" is what you actively do, and "ebriiĝi" is what happens to you as a result. To appreciate the difference, you could consider the following example. Someone with a high tolerance for alcohol might say, "Mi multe drinkis sed mi nur iomete ebriiĝis", meaning, "I drank a lot, but I got only a little drunk."

lingvohelpanto_nl (Wasifu wa mtumiaji) 23 Julai 2006 11:05:44 asubuhi

I would say trinki when drinking sth. but drinki when it's something alcoholic. Drinki is the thing one does in the pub (drink-ej-o) ridulo.gif.

LaPingvino, dutch language-helper.

orthohawk (Wasifu wa mtumiaji) 28 Julai 2006 4:14:56 asubuhi

Kat:Hi! / Saluton!

Yup, you've got it right.  I've got a copy of Peter Benson's "Comprehensive English-Esperanto Dictionary" and the entry for "drink" says (in part):

 drink, (gen), trinki [tr];...(drink alcoholic beverages, esp to excess), drinki [int]

Though you're referred also to the entry for "drunk" which has "ebria" as its root.  "Drunkard" is listed as "drink(em)ulo", tho, whereas "get drunk" is "ebrigi" (that is, if you're getting someone else drunk) or "ebriĝi" (getting drunk).

I'm not sure why you'd have "drinki" and then also "ebrigi/iĝi".  Perhaps "drinki" is a colloquialism.  Hopefully someone in the know will pop in and answer the question (which is a good one, I think)!

Ĝis --

 -- Katjo
Drinki is the Zamenhofan word (I believe it was in the first list he published). Ebria is an "oficiala aldono" (official addition to the list of official roots) which IMNSHO is/was not needed..........as are most of the "oficialaj aldonoj" since the first list was put out ridulo.gif. But them I'm a schematist, so what can you do?
dimo
Iowa City, Iowa

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